Aggregation Layer Metadata

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Area Units (2014)

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Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of area unit boundaries for 2014 as defined by Statistics New Zealand.

Area units are aggregations of adjacent meshblocks with coterminous boundaries to form a single unbroken surface area (land and/or water). Exceptions to this rule are some area units comprising collections of geographically related inlets and marinas. Area units are nonadministrative areas intermediate in size between meshblocks and territorial authorities. In an urban location, an area unit is often a collection of city blocks while in rural situations area units may be equated to localities or communities. Area Units must either define or aggregate to define urban areas, rural centres, statistical areas, territorial authorities and regional councils. Each area unit must be a single geographic entity with a unique name.

The area unit pattern is revised once every five years in the year immediately prior to the taking of a Census of Population and Dwellings. There may also be changes in other years, in conjunction with local body boundary changes. Statistics New Zealand maintains a concordance file to ensure that boundaries relating to earlier area unit patterns can also be generated.

Metadata for the Area Units (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website.

Auckland Grid

Author(s)/Organisation: Iain Matcham (GNS)

Contact Information: GNS

Coordinate System: NZMG

Description:

A 1km grid covering the Auckland Region. Grid cells are name similarly to Excel cells. Increasingly easterly columns are labelled using incrementing letters: A, B, C .... Z, AA, AB, AC ... AZ, BA, BB etc. Increasingly northerly rows are labelled using increasing numeric values. All cells are labelled relative to the bounding box of the whole area, not the actual land area. Thus the southwest-most cell is labelled A1, but this cell will not exist if the area covered does not extend to the southwest corner of its bounding box. The image below shows the area covered by the grid. Click on the image to see a full size version.

Auckland Grid.png

Auckland Meshblocks (2011)

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Author(s)/Organisation: Iain Matcham (GNS)

Contact Information: GNS

Coordinate System: NZMG

Description:

Aggregation to the meshblocks as defined by Statistics New Zealand in 2011.

Community Boards (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of community board boundaries for 2014 as defined by the territorial authorities and Local Government Commission but maintained by Statistics New Zealand, who is the custodian.

Community boards are set up under the Local Government Act 2002 and Local Electoral Act 2001. Their purpose is to administer the affairs of communities with populations not less than 1,500 within rural, urban or metropolitan districts of a territorial authority. A community board’s functions, powers and duties are delegated at the discretion of its parent territorial authority and these may differ from community board to community board. Community boards and their boundaries are reviewed in the year immediately preceding the triennial local government elections.

Community boards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each community board has a unique five digit number. The first three digits refer to the territorial authority that the community board lies within. The following two digits are sequential, and represent the number of community boards within the territorial authority. For example, Tararua District (041) has two community boards numbered 04101 and 04102. The rest of the district is not represented by a community board and is coded 04199 (Area Outside Community).

Some territorial authorities do not have community boards and if they do, the community boards do not necessarily cover the whole territorial authority area.

Local boards also fall within the community board classification. Local boards were introduced as part of the new local government arrangements for Auckland in 2010. Local boards share governance with a council’s governing body and each has complementary responsibilities, guaranteed by legislation. Local boards can propose bylaws and they gather community views on local and regional matters. Local legislation enacted in 2012 allows for the establishment of locals boards in areas of new unitary authorities which are predominantly urban and have a population of more than 400,000. The boundaries of local boards cannot be abolished or changed except through a reorganisation process.

Metadata for the Community Boards (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.

Electoral Wards (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of ward boundaries at 1 January 2014 as defined by the territorial authorities and/or Local Government Commission, but maintained by Statistics New Zealand (who is the custodian).

Wards were originally set up within any territorial authority with a population of at least 20,000. Wards are defined under the Local Electoral Act 2001 and result from the division of a territorial authority for electoral purposes. The ward system was designed to allow for the recognition of communities within a territorial authority and to increase community involvement in the local government system. Territorial authorities can now choose whether they would like to maintain electoral wards. As a result, the number of wards has steadily decreased since they were first created in 1989. Ward boundaries are reviewed in the year immediately preceding the triennial local government elections.

Wards are numbered based on their corresponding territorial authority. Each ward has a unique five digit number. The first three digits represent the territorial authority that the ward lies within. The following two digits are sequential, and represent the number of wards within a territorial authority. For example, Westland District (051) has three wards which are coded 05101, 05102, and 05103.

Several territorial authorities do not use wards. In the data, these territorial authorities use “99” at the end of the ward code, and the descriptor “Area Outside of Ward”.

Metadata for the Wards (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.

Health Boards (2012)

Author(s)/Organisation: New Zealand Ministry of Health

Contact Information: info@health.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Map Grid (NZMG)

Description:

District health boards (DHBs) are responsible for providing or funding the provision of health services in their district. Disability support services and some health services are funded and purchased nationally by the Ministry of Health.

There are 20 DHBs in New Zealand and each DHB is governed by a board of up to 11 members. DHB boards set the overall strategic direction for the DHB and monitor its performance. The Minister of Health appoints up to four members to each board, and the board’s chair and deputy chair. Seven members are publicly elected every three years at the time of local government elections. The Minister can also appoint Crown monitors to boards, in certain circumstances.

The New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000 created DHBs and set out their objectives, which include:

  • improving, promoting and protecting the health of people and communities
  • promoting the integration of health services, especially primary and secondary care services
  • seeking the optimum arrangement for the most effective and efficient delivery of health services in order to meet local, regional, and national needs
  • promoting effective care or support of those in need of personal health services or disability support.

There are currently 20 DHBs in New Zealand. They are required to plan and deliver services regionally, as well as in their own individual areas.

Other DHB objectives include:

  • promoting the inclusion and participation in society and the independence of people with disabilities
  • reducing health disparities by improving health outcomes for Māori and other population groups
  • reducing – with a view toward elimination – health outcome disparities between various population groups.

DHBs are expected to show a sense of social responsibility, to foster community participation in health improvement, and to uphold the ethical and quality standards commonly expected of providers of services and public sector organisations. Public hospitals are owned and funded by DHBs.

Further details on Health Board (2014) boundaries can be found here.

Meshblocks (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of meshblock boundaries for 2014 as defined by Statistics New Zealand.

Statistics New Zealand maintains an annual meshblock pattern for the collection and production of statistical data, allowing data to be compared over time. A meshblock is the smallest geographic unit for which statistical data is collected and processed by Statistics New Zealand. A meshblock is defined by a geographic area, which can vary in size from part of a city block to a large area of rural land. Each meshblock abuts against another to form a network covering all of New Zealand, including coasts and inlets and extending out to the 200 mile economic zone. Meshblocks are added together to build up larger geographic areas such as area units and urban areas. They are also used to define electoral districts, territorial authorities and regional councils.

Meshblocks are allocated a unique seven-digit number. The first 5 digits are unique, and refer to the original 1976 meshblock code. The two end numbers refer to sequential meshblock splits to the original meshblock. When a meshblock is split the final two digits of the original meshblock number are changed. Exceptions to this rule are a small number of meshblocks where no more numbers in the sequence are available. There are therefore some meshblocks in Auckland and Tauranga City starting with 32xxxxx. Statistics New Zealand maintains a concordance file to ensure that boundaries relating to earlier meshblock patterns can also be produced.

There are two ways of amending meshblock boundaries.

1. Splitting is the subdivision of a meshblock into two or more meshblocks. 2. Nudging is the shifting of a boundary to a more appropriate position.

Reasons for splits and nudges were to:

  • accommodate changes to local government boundaries, which are required by the Local Government Act 2002 to follow meshblocks for electoral purposes.
  • accommodate changes to parliamentary electoral boundaries, following each Electoral Representation Commission review after each five yearly Census of Population and Dwellings.
  • make changes to statistical boundaries such as area units and urban areas.
  • enable changes to census collection districts.
  • improve the size balance of meshblocks in areas where there has been population growth.
  • separate land and water e.g. mainland, islands, inlets,oceanic are defined separately.
  • accommodate requests from other users of the meshblock pattern e.g. the NZ Police for their station, area and district boundaries.

The data set is intended for use in the display and presentation of statistical and other data to show areas of high or low density and distributions for comparative purposes over time. The digital geographic boundaries are defined by Statistics New Zealand. They are maintained on behalf of Statistics New Zealand by Land Information New Zealand in Landonline using ArcInfo. Meshblocks cover the land area of New Zealand, the water area to the 12 mile limit, the Chatham Islands, Kermadec Islands, sub-antarctic islands, off-shore oil rigs, and Ross Dependency.

Meshblock boundaries generally follow road centre-lines, cadastral property boundaries or topographical features (e.g. rivers). Expanses of water in the form of lakes and inlets are defined separately from land.

The annual pattern of digital boundaries is used for the full calendar year from 1 January and applies to the timing of the survey – not necessarily when the data is processed.

Metadata for the Meshblocks (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.

Regions (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of regional council boundaries for 2014 as defined by the Local Government Commission and/or regional councils themselves but maintained by Statistics New Zealand (the custodian).

The regional council is the top tier of local government in New Zealand. There are 16 regional councils in New Zealand (defined by Part 1 of Schedule 2 of the Local Government Act 2002). Eleven are governed by an elected regional council, while five are governed by territorial authorities (the second tier of local government) who also perform the functions of a regional council and are known as unitary authorities. These unitary authorities are Auckland Council, Nelson City Council, and Gisborne, Tasman, and Marlborough District Councils. The Chatham Islands Council also performs some of the functions of a regional council, but is not strictly a unitary authority. Unitary authorities act as regional councils for the purposes of a wide range of legislative purposes. Regional councils are responsible for the administration of many environmental and transport matters such as land transport planning and harbour navigation and safety.

Regional Councils were established in 1989 after the abolition of the 22 local government regions. The Local Government Act 2002 requires the boundaries of regions to conform, as far as possible, to one or more water catchments. When determining regional boundaries, the Local Government Commission gave consideration to regional communities of interest when selecting which water catchments to include in a region. It also considered factors such as natural resource management, land use planning and environmental matters. Some regional council boundaries are coterminous with territorial authority boundaries but there are several exceptions. An example is Taupo District, which is geographically split between four regions, although most of its area falls within the Waikato Region. Where territorial local authorities straddle regional council boundaries, the affected area is statistically defined by complete area units. In general, however, regional councils contain complete territorial authorities.

The unitary authority of the Auckland Council was formed in 2010, under the Local Government (Tamaki Makarau Reorganisation) Act 2009, replacing the Auckland Regional Council and seven territorial authorities.

The seaward boundary of any coastal regional council is the twelve mile New Zealand territorial limit.

Regional councils are defined at meshblock and area unit level.

Metadata for the Region (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.


Police Station Areas (2013)

Author(s)/Organisation: New Zealand Police

Contact Information: http://www.police.govt.nz/contact-us

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

New Zealand Police administrative boundaries go out to the 12NM limit and are made up of 12 Police Districts which are divided into Areas. Each Police Area is divided into several Stations. Police Station boundaries are used to record events, and against which statistics are gathered. NOTE: Chatham Islands Station is not included in this dataset, but is part of Wellington District and Wellington Area.

Post Codes (2011)

Author(s)/Organisation: New Zealand Post

Contact Information: https://support.nzpost.co.nz/app/ask

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

The Postcode Network File is the authoritative definition of the New Zealand Post Postcode Network. It is updated every six months, and includes approximately 1800 postcodes incorporating:

  • Urban delivery postcodes.
  • PO Box and Private Bag postcodes.
  • Rural Delivery (RD) postcodesa single-part or multi-part geographic area with postcodes.

Note: There are a number of additional locations used for counter delivery or Community Mail Box delivery that are not included in the Postcode Network File. This is because these locations are not official New Zealand Post Box Lobbies.

A listing of these is available at www.nzpost.co.nz/postcodefinder The primary purpose of postcodes is to assist in the efficient and accurate delivery of mail. Used in New Zealand since 1977, this major revision of postcodes is designed to provide a unique delivery address for all postal addresses on the New Zealand Post network.

The postcode boundaries take into consideration New Zealand Post mail sorting requirements, the density of delivery addresses and the proximity of identical or similar street names. Please note that postcode boundaries do not necessarily reflect suburb boundaries.

Further information on the Post Codes (2011) aggregation module can be found here.

Territory (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of territorial authority boundaries for 2014 as defined by the Local Government Commission and/or the territorial authorities themselves but maintained by Statistics New Zealand (the custodian). A Territorial Authority is defined under the Local Government Act 2002 as a city or a district council.

There is now a total of 67 territorial authorities in New Zealand. This total reflects the amalgamation of the seven territorial authorities (Rodney District, North Shore City, Waitakere City, Auckland City, Manukau City, Papakura District and Franklin District) into one new Auckland Council in 2010.

Territorial authorities are the second tier of local government in New Zealand, below regional councils. The 67 territorial authorities comprise: 13 city councils including the Auckland council, 53 district councils, and the Chatham Islands Territory. Some territorial authority boundaries are coterminous with regional council boundaries but there are several exceptions. An example is Taupo District, which is split between four regions, although most of its area falls within the Waikato Region. When defining the boundaries of territorial authorities, the Local Government Commission based considerable weight on the ‘community of interest’.

Territorial authorities are defined at meshblock and area unit level.

Metadata for the Territory (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.


Urban Areas (2014)

Author(s)/Organisation: Statistics New Zealand

Contact Information: info@stats.govt.nz

Coordinate System: New Zealand Transverse Mercator (NZTM)

Description:

This dataset is the definitive set of urban area boundaries for 2014 as defined by Statistics New Zealand.

Urban areas are statistically defied areas with no administrative or legal basis. Urban area populations are defined internationally as towns with 1000 people or more. The urban area classification is designed to identify concentrated urban or semi-urban settlements without the distortions of administrative boundaries. Urban areas are made up of complete meshblocks and area units.

Prior to 1992 only the main and secondary urban areas had unique two digit codes. From 1992 onwards the structure of the urban area classification was changed to 3 digits, with unique codes for Minor Urban Areas as well as Main and Secondary Urban Areas.

There is a three part hierarchal sub-division of urban areas into:

  • Main Urban Areas
  • Secondary Urban Areas
  • Minor Urban Areas

Main urban areas are very large urban areas centred on a city or major urban centre. Main urban areas have a minimum population of 30,000 and are identified by codes between 001 and 100 such as 020, Wellington. In the 2014 dataset, there are 26 main urban areas. Secondary urban areas were established at the 1981 Census of Population and Dwellings. They have a population between 10,000 and 29,999 and are centred on the large regional centres. Codes for secondary urban areas range between 101 and 200. In the 2014 dataset, there are 17 secondary urban areas.

The remainder of the statistically defined urbanised population of New Zealand are in minor urban areas. Minor urban areas are urbanised settlements (outside main and secondary urban areas), centred around smaller towns with a population between 1,000 and 9,999. Codes for minor urban areas range between 201 and 500.

Rural centres are also defined in the urban area field. Rural centres were established during the 1989 Review of Geostatistical Boundaries. Rural centres have no administrative or legal status, but are statistical units deified by complete area units. They have a population between 300 and 999. These are not termed urban under the standard international definition but identifying these settlements enables users to distinguish between rural dwellers living in true rural areas and those living in rural settlements or townships. The code for rural centres is 501.

Metadata for the Urban Areas (2014) aggregation module can be found on the Statistics New Zealand website here.

Links to pdf

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Area Units (2014)


Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Community Boards (2014)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Electoral Wards (2014)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Health Boards (2012)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Meshblocks (2014)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Police Districts (2013)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Police Stations (2013)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Post Codes (2011)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Regions (2014)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Territories (2014)

Aggregation Module Metadata - NZ - Urban Areas (2014)