Difference between revisions of "Tutorial1-V1.0.0"

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(Final Note)
 
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You Have Now Completed The Tutorial.  
 
You Have Now Completed The Tutorial.  
You May Want to Try Other RiskScape [[Tutorials|Tutorials]] and Test RiskScape for Other Natural Hazards and Impacts. Thank You.
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You May Want to Try Other RiskScape Tutorials and Test RiskScape for Other Natural Hazards and Impacts. Thank You.
  
 
*Please note: This tutorial is for demonstration purposes only and the results produced are not intended to inform natural hazard management decision making. Please contact RiskScape at info@riskscape.org.nz If you would like to find out more about using RiskScape for natural hazard management activities.
 
*Please note: This tutorial is for demonstration purposes only and the results produced are not intended to inform natural hazard management decision making. Please contact RiskScape at info@riskscape.org.nz If you would like to find out more about using RiskScape for natural hazard management activities.

Latest revision as of 01:42, 28 May 2018


Tutorial 1 - Heathcote

This tutorial is aimed at test users of RiskScape and provides an introduction to the functionality of RiskScape. This tutorial follows on from the Quick Start Guide]] and the User Interface Guide]]. You can work through this tutorial at your own pace once you have successfully installed RiskScape onto your PC and familiarised yourself with the RiskScape working environment.

  Download Tutorial 1 - Heathcote.pdf for testers

Overview

For this exercise we will use a scenario from a 200 year Annual Recurrence Interval (ARI) flood event. From this scenario we will produce datasets using both RiskScape and the in-built Asset Mitigation tool to investigate the reduction of flood impacts and costs for buildings by raising their floor levels. This tutorial will show you how to: • Run a scenario in RiskScape • Examine different impacts

Step 1: Load RiskScape

Using the programs menu find and start RiskScape; or double click on the RiskScape icon on your desktop. RiskScape is loading when you see the image below appear on your screen

Tutorial1-H1.png

Step 2: Run a model for building and human impacts – Activity A

Once RiskScape has loaded, maximise the screen. Download your Asset, Hazard, Aggregation, and Calculate modules. To do this, click on the “Module Manager” tab (encircled in the picture).

Tutorial1-H2.png

A dialogue box will appear as shown in the picture to the right. You can organize how the information is displayed by clicking on one of the Module Manager tabs. For this Tutorial, click on “Type” (encircled), which will organize the data according to module type.

Tutorial1-H3.png

Select and Download Christchurch Buildings 2010 (Assets), Christchurch Heathcote Flood (Hazards), Canterbury Suburbs 2006 (Aggregation), Flood Impacts – Depth Only (Calculate)

Tutorial1-H4.png
  • NOTE 1: You must select a layer first so that it is highlighted, and then “right click” your mouse and then select “download”. If the module is not highlighted, you may be downloading a module you do not want.
  • NOTE 2: To download multiple modules, hold “control” and “select” the modules you want, and then right click and hit download.
Tutorial1-H5.png
  • NOTE 3: Once you click download the first time, you will be prompted to enter your RiskScape portal username and password. Enter these and click OK. You will notice a status bar indicating download progress on the right of the selected layer.
  • NOTE 4: A tick will appear at the right of the selected layer that you downloaded once the download is complete, and the downloaded modules will appear for selection in the “Analysis Tab” of the Analysis and Library Panel (see Next Step).
Tutorial1-H6.png

Step 3: Run a model for building and human impacts – Activity B

In the four decision boxes in the “Analysis” tab of the Analysis and Library Panel, choose the assets, hazard and impacts for the model run. For this exercise select Christchurch Buildings 2010 (Assets), Canterbury Suburbs 2006 (Aggregation), Flood (Hazards), and Damage State and Reinstatement Costs (Impacts). You will see that other Impacts are available for selection, however, for this analysis we will only select Damage State and Reinstatement Cost.

Add selections to Library by clicking on Add to library (encircled).

Tutorial1-H7.png

Step 4: Analysis Wizard

Once you click on Add to library in Step 3 above, a wizard will open up prompting you to complete the remaining decisions needed to add your analysis to the library.

Tutorial1-H8.png

Click Next to proceed

Step 5: Choose a building dataset

The first model refinement decision will be to choose a building dataset. As impacts to all Christchurch buildings are of interest we will select the Use complete dataset option.

If you were interested in modelling the impacts to a subset of Christchurch buildings (e.g. timber buildings) you can choose the ‘Use subset’ option and use the entire Christchurch building dataset for use in the model run.

Select Use complete dataset and click Next.

Tutorial1-H9.png

Step 6: Choose a flood model

One or a number of hazard models could be available for an asset type in the area of interest. In this case, Christchurch has flood inundation models for different climate change scenarios, Heathcote River 100 and 200 year ARI flood events pre- and post- 2011 Christchurch earthquake. For this model run we will model a post- 2011 Christchurch earthquake Heathcote River 200 year ARI flood event.

Select Christchurch Heathcote Flood. (Shown above)

Click Next to continue. (Shown above)

Step 7: Choose Hazard Parameters

For each hazard model option there may be a number of options available e.g. Annual Return Intervals (ARI). For the Christchurch Heathcote Flood module there are flood inundation models for 100 and 200 year ARI flood events.

Select the 200 year ARI flood event (ARI 200) in the ‘Scenario’ drop-down menu

Click Next to continue.

Tutorial1-H10.png

Step 8: Choose Impact Model(s)

Flood impacts to buildings can be determined in RiskScape from a vulnerability model that uses a relationship between building impacts and either a flood-depth and velocity module or flood-depth module. While flood flow velocity can have an important influence on the levels of building damage experienced, we will use the Flood Impacts - Depth Only Model option for impacts in this analysis.

Select depth only and click Next to continue. (Shown above)

Step 9: Choose time of impact occurrence

Time of occurrence can be an important influence on flood damage to buildings and their contents as people present can take precautions to reduce damage e.g. storing possessions above flood water levels. Building occupancy reduces during daytime as people leave for work, school etc.

Select Daytime for the model run to maximise the potential building and contents impacts for the 200 year ARI event

Click Next to continue.

Tutorial1-H11.png

Step 10: Choose a mitigation factor

Similar to Step 8, none or a short warning prior to flooding will potentially result in greater building and content damage from an event as people have less time to take precautions that reduce damage. To further maximise the potential building contents loss for the 200 year ARI event we will select No flood warning and short lead time.

Select No flood warning and short lead time.

Click Next.

Name the model run and click Finish to continue.

Tutorial1-H12.png

Step 11: Add model run to library and run analysis

Find your model run in the Library and click on the “Play” button to perform the analysis.

Tutorial1-H13.png

After clicking the “Play” button, you can track the progress of the analysis being in the “Console Panel” (1). It might take a minute or so as the impacts for the run are being calculated.

Tutorial1-H14.png

You will notice that some icons are greyed. These cannot be used during the analysis but will appear when the analysis is completed and will be used to export the model run results in Step 12.

Tutorial1-H15.png

You will see that the analysis run is complete when you the message “Analysis Complete” appears in the ‘Console Panel’ (2), and when the greyed icons can now be accessed (3).

Step 12: View the assets, hazard, and exposure results

Asset attribute information represents the characteristics of a building (or person, lifeline utility etc.). These assets will be impacted upon differently by a hazard for example the type of construction will determine the strength of a building to withstand a hazard.

Tutorial1-H16.png

On the user interface open an asset map by clicking on the ‘house/magnify glass’ icon and the ‘bar graph/magnify glass’ icon (e.g. View the assets used in this analysis and view the results of this analysis).

This enables you to view the assets and exposures used from the model run.

Select Asset Exposures, then Finish Repeat this step for Damage States, then Reinstatement Costs

Tutorial1-H16b.png

These layers will appear in the Layers tab on the right, and you can now use the overlaid layers to view the locations of impacted/affected buildings relative to the flood inundated area.

Tutorial1-H17.png

Zoom in to Christchurch (Heathcote) to get a better view of the results.

  • Tip: Toggle layer visibility by clicking on the eyeball icon next to each layer

Step 13: Overlay building impact results on the flood inundation model

Toggle layer visibility on for Christchurch Buildings, Inundation Velocity, and Damage State.

Click the Symbology tab and select Damage State in the Select Layer and Select Attribute dropdown menus, then click Apply.

Tutorial1-H18.png

The map will display the affected buildings (damage states) relative to the flood inundation velocity. To view the results relative to flood depth, click on layers and Toggle Layer Visibility on for Inundation Depth, and turn off Inundation Velocity.

Zoom in to a portion of the Heathcote River. You should notice that higher damage state levels generally fall within areas close to the river (inundated areas).

Tutorial1-H19.png
Tutorial1-H20.png

Leave the map open and move to the next step.

Step 14: Export aggregated model results

Building reinstatement cost results aggregated for Christchurch Suburb unit areas can be viewed or exported.

Click on the ‘View/export aggregated results of this analysis’ icon (encircled) (1).

Tutorial1-H22.png

For this step we will choose to aggregate Reinstatement Costs from the model run then export the aggregated Asset Repair cost results as a csv file.

Select Reinstatement Costs and then click Next (2).

Select CSV – MS Excel etc and then click Next (3).

Tutorial1-H23.png

Select Open Excel or Save and then click Finish to open the results in a csv file (4).

Tutorial1-H24.png

You will see the message “Writing csv file” in the “Console Panel” after you click finish (5), indicating progress of file creation. Excel should open up with your exported data once the file has been created. Alternatively, navigate to the directory that you saved the file in if you had clicked Save.

Repeat this step to output the building Damage State results, by selecting Damage State instead of Reinstatement Costs in 2.

We will want to compare the results from this scenario with another, so save the excel files somewhere easy to find later

Step 15: Sum the Reinstatement Costs

Open the Reinstatement Costs CSV file (excel file). Sum the aggregated suburb results for each column to calculate the total reinstatement costs for the event.

Tutorial1-H25.png
  • Tip: When the excel file opens use the filter options to sort the results. Filter by the Asset Repair from largest to smallest (total costs can be calculated using the sum function).

Plot the results for the regions with reinstatement costs on a bar graph (in the image a logarithmic scale has been used) to show the distribution of potential direct building impact costs (including vehicles) from the flood.

Tutorial1-H26.png

Step 16: Sum the Damage States

Open the Damage States CSV file (excel file). Repeat Step 16 to calculate the total number of buildings for a given damage state.

Tutorial1-H27.png

Plot the results for the regions on a bar graph (in the image a logarithmic scale has been used) to show the distribution of potential direct building damage states from the flood.

Have a think about how the combined results can be used to inform hazard/risk preparedness planning along the Heathcote River.

Tutorial1-H28.png

Please submit your feedback to Gaby or via the JIRA system.

Final Note

You Have Now Completed The Tutorial. You May Want to Try Other RiskScape Tutorials and Test RiskScape for Other Natural Hazards and Impacts. Thank You.

  • Please note: This tutorial is for demonstration purposes only and the results produced are not intended to inform natural hazard management decision making. Please contact RiskScape at info@riskscape.org.nz If you would like to find out more about using RiskScape for natural hazard management activities.

Please submit your feedback to The RiskScape Team or via the JIRA system.

You have finished the Tutorial